Camp Motorpsycho » General

THE DEATH DEFYING UNICORN

(392 posts)
  1. supernaut
    Member

    The sax solo at the end of La Lethe reminds of Supertramp. Not because saxophone equals Supertramp but there's something about the melody and the arrangement around it that feels like 1974 Supertramp. In a good way!

    (btw their first and very unsuccessfull album with a different line up than the one of later fame is a lost pearl in the archives of hippiesk prog music. romantic, lush with rather restrained playing and therefore quite beautiful)

    Posted 6 years ago #
  2. fillmore
    Member

    TDDU is record of the month in the monthly PDF zine "Guitars Galore" (German).

    Posted 6 years ago #
  3. Coventry Boy
    Member

    Found this nice Video on Youtube

    Motorpsycho - The Death Defying Unicorn - Sharks

    Posted 6 years ago #
  4. TAF
    Member

    Same video was posted two pages back in this thread.

    Nice video, though.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  5. Coventry Boy
    Member

    Obviously I missed something during my vacation.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  6. ThorEgil
    Member

    Seems like the Unicorn might be jazz after all

    Now reviewed by All About Jazz.
    One could imagine the boys beeing quite happy about this one.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  7. TAF
    Member

    Quite a review, too!

    Posted 6 years ago #
  8. ThorEgil
    Member

    Two more interviews from Adressa which they couldn't be bothered to publish on the net.
    The first is from before the first concert and the second is from the day after.


    Posted 6 years ago #
  9. Hallejuwa
    Member

    For en mannj! As a young musician myself, i get so inspired everytime Bent comes with these wise words of truth. Especially the Townsend quote was very fitting. What a man, what a band!

    Posted 6 years ago #
  10. supernaut
    Member

    somebody translate the townsend bit please?

    bent looks like gary sinise here. CSI trondheim.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  11. otherdemon
    Member

    Roughly translated:

    "Pete Townsend once said: I'm proud to call myself an artist, any cunt can be an entertainer. The Norwegian language doesn't really separate one from the other. If you sing a couple of lines on TV2 (one of the Norwegian national TV channels), then you're considered an artist. It's an extremely arrogant thing to say, but also inspiring. You have to be slightly elitist to push enough for something to happen. You can't safe your way through this; you only get one chance."

    I was extremely happy to read the end of the first article. They're writing new material; ranging from very concentrated things to the songs they did in Nidarosdomen and Oslo Domkirke. They feel that they have 2-3 more records worth of great material.

    Good news. The songs from Nidaros and Oslo deserves release

    Posted 6 years ago #
  12. supernaut
    Member

    thanks.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  13. supernaut
    Member

    that townsend/artist line can very much be brought into the MP-vocal debate. entertainers hit the right notes but artists focus on expressing themselves.

    (yes i'm aware of the thousand examples that defy this simple statement but it's still a worthy thought)

    Posted 6 years ago #
  14. jkelman
    Member

    My review of Death Defying Unicorn was published yesterday at All About Jazz: http://j.mp/zABM20

    Enjoy!

    Posted 6 years ago #
  15. harry
    Member

  16. fillmore
    Member

    Pretty in Noise Review (German)

    Posted 6 years ago #
  17. ThorEgil
    Member

    **** in Mojo today

    Posted 6 years ago #
  18. GBD
    Member

    that townsend/artist line can very much be brought into the MP-vocal debate. entertainers hit the right notes but artists focus on expressing themselves. [:D]

    (yes i'm aware of the thousand examples that defy this simple statement but it's still a worthy thought

    Horsecrap imo! Just look at Geddy Lee of Rush; Playing intricate basslines, keyboards, pedals ++ live , but he still manages to sing way better then our guys do. And if he's not an artist, then who is?

    The bottom line is that one after 20+ years should be able to expect a better vocal preformance then what's being delivered these days. And the almost mind boggling thing about it all is that they actually sang way better in the past. What gives??!

    Posted 6 years ago #
  19. supernaut
    Member

    that was one of the thousand examples that defy this simple statement but it's still a worthy thought.

    and maybe they sing worse now than in the past - though I wouldn't go out on that limb since I haven't heard all the live recordings from 20+ MP years - because the playing nowadays is much more demanding.

    But debates like these frighten me a bit. I'd rather expect these in a (shudder) Dream (shudder) Theater forum. Or one for Rush for that matter although I really like them. I see a nerdy male 37+ years old audience making notes during shows about the mistakes they hear to post and discuss on a board as soon as they're back home.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  20. harry
    Member

    lol @ the (shudder)!

    And as Jimi put it: only cowboys play in tune anyway.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  21. Vegard B. Havdal
    Member

    Glenn Hughes shows how it's done (!):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGoFC_p2V0k

    In those days, the headliner tuned up on stage.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  22. otherdemon
    Member

    No offense, but I hate Geddy Lee & his shitty falsetto vocals! For me they have ruined quite a lot of the musical greatness that Rush have... Same thing with Bruce Dickinson in Iron Maiden: Great band, singer fucks it all up.

    I'd take a slightly sour Bent/Snah combo every day over Geddy Lee

    Posted 6 years ago #
  23. supernaut
    Member

    No offense, but I hate Geddy Lee & his shitty falsetto vocals! For me they have ruined quite a lot of the musical greatness that Rush have...

    I wouldn't agree on that considering their post 1980 and especially the most current stuff but their earlier albums really are a chalk-on-the-board listen due to him.

    But...

    I'd take a slightly sour Bent/Snah combo every day over Geddy Lee

    I definitely can't disagree with that.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  24. supernaut
    Member

    In those days, the headliner tuned up on stage.

    true. makes me think why I even bother with muting tuning pedals. having everything as sterile as can be in a rockshow? hmm...

    Glenn Hughes has some ear torturing singing attitude going. I'd take Geddy Lee anyday over him.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  25. otherdemon
    Member

    I wouldn't agree on that considering their post 1980 and especially the most current stuff but their earlier albums really are a chalk-on-the-board listen due to him.

    Ok, I haven't heard much of the post 1980 material, so he might've moderated his singing drastically for all I know. But it kinda annoys me that 70's Rush are so musically competent, and then Geddy Lee doesn't vary his robotic Jon Anderson-falsetto at all. He sounds dangerously similar to a smurf at times

    Posted 6 years ago #
  26. GBD
    Member

    @ Supernaut

    To me, there's nothing wrong with expecting some skills from artists that have taken on vocal duties for 20 years, no matter how great their music is. To me, it's become such an irritating thing that i quietly wish that their next musical venture will be an instrumental one. I mean....they sound KILLER on albums, and so it's such a let down to go to a live show, and getting served sourball after sourball throughout the show.

    Don't get me wrong....I love the band to death! I just hope that they focus abit more on the vocals for live shows in the future. Or stop setting the bar way too high for themselves on albums, and then bomb on stage...

    PS: Their music isn't that much more demanding now then before if you think about it.

    @Otherdemon:

    It's your choice to hate Geddy Lees vocals. But the point still stands. He really captures the flow and feel of his vocals on albums when playing live.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  27. kjesso
    Member

    That four-star Mojo review in full:

    Modern day Norwegian psychsters Motorpsycho reached a career peak with their last album, the fantastically named Heavy Metal Fruit. Taking its name from a lyric in Blue Oyster Cult's apocalyptic tune, Me 262, the album rippled with post-Deep Purple dynamism and jazz inflections. The latter are given full and further rein on this 2-CD set, the music for which was commissioned in 2010 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Molde International Jazz Festival. Teamed with keyboard player Ståle Storløkken and the Trondheim Jazz Orchestra, the power trio sculpt a phenomenal album which cuts across rock, jazz and neo-classical music with gleeful abandon. From volcanic guitarmageddon (Hollow Lands) to moments of grand ambition (the 10-minute plus swoop of Into The Gyre), this is as bold and as progressive as rock gets.
    (Review by Phil Alexander)

    Posted 6 years ago #
  28. supernaut
    Member

    @otherdemon
    With Permanent Waves Geddy drastically lowered his range except for that Freewill part, which has reportedly the highest singing part in the whole Rush catalogue. I prefer the handful of albums they did right then up to Grace Under Pressure to the sometimes way too bombastic stuff from the 70ties. Then they did some terrible albums mid to late 80ties but came back to form with Counterparts. Vapor Trails and everything thenafter I find very enjoyable. Back to "classic rock" without the shrieking vocals. And the Feedback cover album has some nice tunes, taken from Neil Young to The Who.

    @GBD
    Well I never got sourballs or bombing shows from them. That's because I enjoy what I hear as an overall presentation. I purposedly don't listen to details or little mistakes. For me MP live is a physical belly gutsy hearty thing and in the best possible case a transcendent experience. And their current music is most definitely more demanding to play. There's tons of odd meters and weird breaks and Snah's chords and harmonies are way beyond the usual rock scaling. Now they have to sing to all that every night at deafening volumes. Oh I never would want them to set any bar lower just to hit the notes right. That's a weird wish. I respect how they push themselves and their music, even at the risk of going over the brink, and I want to follow them when witnessing it. Like Led Zeppelin in their prime. Tons of odd and broken weird guitar solos by Jimmy Page but so what? They wanted to boldly go out there every night, too, at whatever cost, and sounded different every night. This going out there attitude is what brought TDDU to life in the first place and this is the reason why 99% of "progressive" bands will never even get close to its idea nowadays. Add to that the open nature of their live arrangements and the stretching out without safety nets. It's their desire to experiment and their total devotion to music and to being a musician. There's way too many people always traveling the safe side when making music. And the last thing I wish Motorpsycho to do is to get safe and boring. I'd take some sour notes anyday over that.
    I had to endure Dream Theater for example due to working at a venue and it was terrible. Music by robots. Why not stay home listening to the records? Why not demanding a percentage of the entry ticket money back according to the mistakes played? I find it weird to "demand" anything from the artist expect their 100% energy and dedication for this evening (on a sidenote, to quote Rollins: "fuck the bands who do warm-up gigs!", because this stands for respecting one audience less than that other one in the bigger city's more important venue). So I'd rather have them screaming and playing wrong notes with full dedication than to be perfectly on pitch all the time while repeating the same songs in the same safe-bet manner every night, being in full control because the bar's been set just low enough. If they'd ever do that, that's when I probably will stop going to see them and I shudder to think of this. But I'm convinced this will never happen. That's just the way they do it and what they deliver and so it's what we get, teh 100% real shit in a manner incomparable to other bands. Very much fortunately.

    I know I'm playing one thing (energy & dedication) against the other (perfect playing and singing) when both could go together just fine. But maybe not in things Motorpsycho, and if so, then I simply prefer the first to the second thing. And who are we to demand that? Shall we boycott the shows to make them practice more or what?

    I pretty much stopped listening to audience live recordings btw. Because they never sound right (no offense to you recording guys, that's in their very nature) and sour vocal notes of course do jump out much stronger than when heard right there at the venue, but also the instrumentation is mostly way out of balance. So I don't know..., maybe listening too much to those recordings kinda stains the perception of Motorpsycho live? A band that's actually THE BEST FUCKING LIVE BAND EVER!?

    Coming back to Rush again, I went to see them last year for my first time and I sooo didn't care if they played the solos and drumfill all correctly right down to the subatomar level, as opposed to probably 90% of the audience around me. I just enjoyed it. The sound, the music, the songs (though it was a bit of a disappointing setlist) and mostly the energy and their joy of playing.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  29. GBD
    Member

    let's just agree to disagree man!

    Posted 6 years ago #
  30. GBD
    Member

    Ok one more thing....

    You're making it sound like i'm bashing their music, which i'm certainly not doing. I agree with everything you're saying when it comes to the musical part of both their albums, shows and overall philosophy. From my standpoint it's purely a vocal issue, and will alyways be just that. But (again for me) it's come to a point where i find it almost embarrasing to listen to, and it ruins what could have been epic experiences when seeing them live (been to a number of shows now, and will see them in London). And the worst part is that i don't even find myself being harsh saying theese things. The reason being; When so many good bands out there manage to re-capture their studio music so overall well when they're playing live, it's just strange to see that MP can't seem to overcome this obsticle. I could have been more forgiving if Bent wrote "Na na na - i'm in love with a girl" lyrics set to a limited vocal ranged melody line. But bent really puts thought and passion into both his lyrics and melodies, and so i think it's pretty safe to say that he takes vocals and melody pretty much as seriously as the music when writing and recording albums. So why not live? Why settle for mediocre vocals live when every thing else is so damn good? I just don't get it...And don't tell me that it's because their music is too complex. I don't buy that for a second...

    But just to clarify; I'm not demanding anything. I'm just saying that i find it strange, and abit irritating. In the end, you're probably right about them doing their thing like they've always done (thank god), and so they'll never bother to care about this. But i'm entitled to find it frustrating nevertheless. To shed some light on the thing, discuss, rant abit and then let it go. Cus in the end their overall music plus killer instrumental skills live make up for their vocal shortcomings. Though one can dream of a show where their vocals match the music in skill, can't one?

    PS; I find it funny that you consider Dream Theater as "Music by Robots". Ok, i'm not that keen on the band, but i feel that they play with an equal amount of passion and determination as MP does nevertheless. They've just rehearsed more! So what you consider "robotism" i consider being almost inhumanly good based on the fact that they're taking it dead seriously....both live and on album!

    Posted 6 years ago #

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