Camp Motorpsycho » General

Motorpsycho and Rush

(81 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by Punj Lizard
  • Latest reply from bionaut

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  1. bionaut
    Member

    Hi Harry, He went to the local record store and found a used copy of 'Heavy Metal Fruit'. I was amazed, because MP vinyl is not often seen in the USA.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. Punj Lizard
    Member

    I asked a music writer friend of mine to listen to MP and tell me what he heard. He said, "like Yes at their peak doing their best attempt at Live/Dead."

    That's pretty bloody funny.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. supernaut
    Member

    Innersfree bell at around 1:25 reminds me of the opening bells of Cygnus X-1.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. Lorentz
    Member

    If I may add…

    At the opening session related to the Motorpsycho exhibition at Rockheim a few years ago, it was this live interview with Bent and HMR. Looking back to the times they met, Bent stated “Rush and Rainbow” as a part of their common musical fundament.

    Fortunately, the very early 80’s was characterized by a myriad of bands within the small community where the boys originated. Mostly within punk/folk/blues. However, it was this band from Steinkjer named Time. Of course it was a power/prog trio with the town’s most gifted drummer treating the gear. Rumors were told that Terry Brown might be producing their debut album -:) The rise and fall of Time is a very short story…

    Point is that a lot of music heads within the community were great Rush fans at that time. So there were a reasonable number of people out there guiding you in the right direction as a youngster with ears tuned to rock music. For most of us this passion relates to the albums Rush did from “2112” to the phenomenal live album “Exit…Stage Left” which basically concludes the golden ages. From a musical point of view, those albums opened the doors to what among others Crimson, Yes and Genesis etc could offer for further investigations

    Needless to say probably, but common to Rush fans is the fascination to what only three guys were able to output of tight, complex and great music (especially live) with all this energy. All this performed by world-class musicians. The Geddy Lee simultaneous pedaling, bass play and vocals did really set the benchmark of what could be a physical possibility as a performing rock artist. So the greatest impact Rush had to Motorpsycho is may be the band format rather than a distinct musical footprint (The boys can be seen in concerts nowadays wearing double-necked guitars, Taurus pedals, Mellotrons etc etc)

    When HMR found his beloved and legendary Moog Taurus MkII bass pedal machine in 1991 (still in use today), the course was more or less set.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. supernaut
    Member

    The mighty Taurus! I've never been aware of its existence until hearing it live in 1997. I've seen the boys before but maybe due to those early clubs the Taurus didn't have quite the impact... But that 97 show was full on Moog assault. So I went hunting and got me the MkI a couple of years later. Playing live while the Taurus' first big show moment is getting closer and closer and then you step on the low C (hopefully), that's just sheer joy.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. Lorentz
    Member

    Bob Moog – The One and Only

    Thank you for pointing out the Taurus thing. HMR’s Taurus has been around almost since the start of the band. It is probably the single piece of equipment with the longest life-span within the band. It is not a coincidence, and The Mighty Taurus is generating one of the most significant signatures to the band. It is clearly a part of the orchestra’s sound characteristics already on Soothe, and The Taurus plays an even more prominent role on Demon Box.

    The link to Rush is in The Taurus perspective evident. Listening to tracks like “Xanadu” and “Jacobs Ladder” from the legendary live album Exit … Stage Left, 1981, gives the clear vision on how a small line-up can cover the full frequency range. Those songs move you even today. I just wonder if a track like “Un chien d'espace” would have seen the day of light in the way it did without having “Xanadu” as a part of bands education.

    Keep in mind that the extensive use of Mini Moog that was characterizing this period of rock music (extensively used by Rush/Rainbow and many others) never became a fundamental tool for MP.

    Regarding live performances, I believe that BS is also adding to the deeper sound levels utilizing the newer Taurus Mk3. To my opinion, nothing is kicking ass like a MK1/Mk2. Thanks to Dr. Tos Nieuwenhuizen, the HMR’s old Mk2 is in full service after all those years despite the logistical challenges to keep this unique machine operational. For instance, just try to imagine the contribution of The Taurus at the massive end part of STG.

    Sail on

    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. Lorentz
    Member

    Btw

    Gene Simmons elaborating over Kiss touring USA along with Rush in 1975

    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. bionaut
    Member

    OK, I submit. I hear Rush influences in Motorpsycho. In fact, I am laughing after hearing Bent, I think, impersonate Geddy Lee after playing 'The Cuckoo' in London from the just-ending Crucible tour. "Now, we'd like to play side one from our recent album 'Hemispheres'. That was really funny!

    Posted 7 months ago #
  9. supernaut
    Member

    I'd say Bent is even sporting a 1977 Geddyish 'do at the moment....

    Posted 7 months ago #
  10. Punj Lizard
    Member

    RIP Neil.

    Posted 2 weeks ago #
  11. suntripper
    Member

    Seconded. Clearly a very talented drummer (if a little flashy for my tastes). The three members of Rush have dealt with the situation over the last three or four years with dignity. Have to say, though, and I'm probably slow on the uptake here, I've only just discovered his lyrics were influenced by Ayn Rand. Not so cool. Nevertheless, RIP.

    Posted 2 weeks ago #
  12. Punj Lizard
    Member

    We had some heated discussion about the Ayn Rand influences earlier in this thread. Neil later dropped his support for Rand's politics.

    Posted 2 weeks ago #
  13. suntripper
    Member

    Yeah, I had a look back. Didn't realize what I'd stepped into there! Interesting he dropped Rand. I'll have to see if I can find out why.

    Posted 2 weeks ago #
  14. supernaut
    Member

    I assume (well I think I also read so somewhere) he dropped Rand due to getting older, wiser, his travels and seeing the world as it is. Real experience took over from (post)adolescent reading. So there... live to learn and change. I respect that.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  15. Norman_Gold
    Member

    I assume (well I think I also read so somewhere) he dropped Rand due to getting older, wiser, his travels and seeing the world as it is. Real experience took over from (post)adolescent reading. So there... live to learn and change. I respect that.

    "assume"... "think I also read somewhere"... blah blah. "live to learn and change. I respect that." Wow! You're so generous to respect that. Still and again: The usual patronising, stuck up, self-righteous snobbery.

    To refuse Rand and her ideas means for you to be mature, wise (hahaha, that's a good one), an intellectual supreme cosmopolitan. What an exceptionally blunt kind of self-righteousness!

    In the logical reverse you identify Rand and people accepting or following her ideas as immature, unwise, that they never travel, are too stupid to "seeing the world as it is".

    Who the hell you think you are? Again you show a dismissive manure, intolerance and antipathy against everyone that seems not to share exactly your ideology. What is this, if not immature, encapsulated and unwise?

    Posted 5 days ago #
  16. fuzzrules
    Member

    One of the things I really like about this forum is that people tend to listen and share ideas. Generally with respect for each others opinion. Concerning Ayn Rand, here’s a quote from the wiki-page dedicated to her:

    "I am not primarily an advocate of capitalism, but of egoism; and I am not primarily an advocate of egoism, but of reason. If one recognizes the supremacy of reason and applies it consistently, all the rest follows."

    I wonder how she would look at the world in its current state, had she still lived.

    Posted 4 days ago #
  17. suntripper
    Member

    Reason is a very important tool, of course, albeit limited by one's capacity for reason. However, even if one had a perfect capacity for reason - untroubled by those pesky feelings - one would still only be capable of reasoning about that concerning which one had knowledge. Now, if you are only open to knowledge from sources which your reason, in the context of your sum of knowledge, allows to exist, I would say that you are not getting the whole picture.

    Posted 4 days ago #
  18. supernaut
    Member

    @Norman

    Chill, dude. That's why I wrote "I assume". And you're assuming or rather making stuff up just as well. And what do you mean by "again you show a yaddayaddayadda..."? I must have missed something.

    Posted 2 days ago #
  19. supernaut
    Member

    ah I looked up "assume". Lots of meanings to the word. Swap it with reckon, think, guess or whatever you prefer

    ATTENTION ALL PLANETS OF THE NON-JUDGEMENTAL FEDERATION:

    WE HAVE ASSUMED CONTROL!

    Posted 2 days ago #
  20. Norman_Gold
    Member

    I wonder how she would look at the world in its current state, had she still lived.

    That would be quite obvious, wouldn't it?

    «The most puzzling development in politics during the last decade is the apparent determination of Western European leaders to re-create the Soviet Union in Western Europe.» (Michail Gorbatschow)

    For many in nearly the whole western world, a hard built up welfare state is taken for granted and seems to lure them into musings for socialistic ideas. There's an attitude of laziness, paired with an aggressive sort of entitlement, preferably justified with an accusing sort of moralism. It mostly comes combined with a naive idealization of centralism, in conjunction with the degradation of the independent, self governing nation state, or such old-fashioned ideas as diligence or personal responsibility.

    Well-founded on her own background, Rand would refer to the drastically failed experimentation with socialism: Afghanistan, Ukraine, Lithuania, Zimbabwe, Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia, most countries in Central America, DDR, Kirgistan, China, Pakistan, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Indo-China, Korean Peninsula...

    On the other hand, there's the liberal agenda of Donald Trump (and other modern populists) with his focus on strengthening the domestic working class, families and communities. Deregulation (for every new law in, eight went out) let companies breathe, innovate and invest again. Tax cuts unburdens individuals, families and companies. The result so far: 7 million new jobs since his election; 1,2 million in manufacturing and construction alone. 12'000 new industrial firms established. Unemployment rate as low as 1968; for blacks, latinos and hispanics on its lowest ever recorded. Wages rising on all incoming levels; for workers now faster than for managers. There's a lot more still, for example his agenda on foreign affair, which is an achievement on its own.

    Is Ayn Rand up-to-date? For people like me and obviously The Donald, her ideas appear to be fresh, inspiring and usable; the positive impact for the vast majority of America's people speaks on its own. At least, Rand's ideas should be taken as an excellent benchmark to evaluate where we stand now. But to generally demonize her is as stupid as it is suspicious.

    Posted 2 days ago #
  21. bionaut
    Member

    Cop a feel
    Make a deal
    Shit is all too real

    Hey Norman, I am a 58-year old American living on Cape Cod. May I ask, what country are you from and where do you live now? How old are you? Just curious.

    Posted 1 day ago #

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